ACR Bulletin

Covering topics relevant to the practice of radiology

The Future Is Now

New power dynamics can help us find our place in an old-power world.
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The ACR understands the changing needs of our patients and the fluid definition of what a career in radiology is going to mean for the generation coming into practice now.

—Sonia Gupta, MD
February 01, 2019

PHOTO CAPTION: (Left to right) ACR YPS Chair Sonia Gupta, MD, Magda Rizer, DO, Agnieszka Solberg, MD, and YPS Social Media Liaison Taj Kattapuram, MD, are pictured at the YPS reception at ACR 2018. Solberg and Kattapuram co-hosted the Dec. 11 Book Club, “New Power: How Power Works in our Hyperconnected World – and How To Make it Work for You.”

New power dynamics can help us find our place in an old-power world.

The opportunities and challenges of finishing training and beginning a career in the current medical landscape are multifaceted: mounting medical school debt, burnout, corporatization, and anxiety about AI and its implications for the profession, to name a few. However, emerging radiologists are also benefitting from a robust job market and exciting new technological advances.

The YPS represents this group of over 6,000 radiologists, who are in their first eight years of practice after training or under the age of 40. YPS members have risen to many unforseen challenges in radiology, while also positioning themselves and the subspecialty for success beyond the reading room. Many YPS members are seizing opportunities to consult for AI companies and to improve workflows in their practices.

We are fortunate to have Geraldine B. McGinty, MD, MBA, FACR, at the ACR’s helm to provide us with new opportunities to engage our membership. Her leadership style, which incorporates many elements of “new power” dynamics (based on the book New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World — and How to Make It Work for You), has opened countless doors for RFS and YPS involvement in the leadership of the College. In December 2018, the YPS, the ACR Senior and/or Retired Section (SRS), and @RadiologyChicks hosted an enthusiastic book club discussion on this topic of new power, with author Henry Timms and SRS Chair Catherine J. Everett, MD, MBA, FACR, serving as panelists. It is these types of collaborations between generations that will help all of us better understand each other and ultimately result in quality care for our patients.

The concepts of mentorship and sponsorship are also being embraced by the ACR leadership. These types of relationships are essential to the success of individual radiologists and the profession as a whole. As YPS members emerge as private practice leaders and begin to head academic divisions, this type of training grows in importance. The need to plan for smooth leadership succession is essential, and YPS members have access to radiology experts and thought leaders in the field. The more seasoned members of the College are eager to provide mentorship and advice to our mid-career members. Many of the connections that lead to these strong relationships are starting over social media, which RFS-YPS Liaison Amy K. Patel, MD, noted during her Fast 5 presentation at RSNA 2018: “We are all equals on social media.”

Social media allows YPS members to directly reach out to key players, such as patients, presidents of large private practice groups, the ACR BOC, AI companies, and those who are working specifically in a particular area of interest.

—Sonia Gupta, MD
Social media allows YPS members to directly reach out to key players, such as patients, presidents of large private practice groups, the ACR BOC, AI companies, and those who are working specifically in a particular area of interest. The new power concept of transparent communication led YPS Social Media Liaison Taj Kattapuram, MD, to be invited as a Grand Rounds speaker after an exchange on Twitter.

I am optimistic that the ACR will always be at the forefront of advocating for our patients and profession. The ACR Commission on Patient- and Family-Centered Care is an excellent example of the type of forward-thinking we need to adapt to our changing practice environment. As we transition from volume to value-based medicine, the expectations of a radiologist will change dramatically. Dania Daye, MD, PhD, a radiology resident at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, co-led the implementation of a virtual consult program directly connecting radiologists to patients (read the full Imaging 3.0® case study at acr.org/Virtually-Connected).

The ACR understands the changing needs of our patients and the fluid definition of what a career in radiology is going to mean for the generation coming into practice now. Despite the challenges the YPS section faces, I believe a career in radiology will continue to allow us to be fulfilled and intellectually stimulated, as we provide excellent patient care.

Author Sonia Gupta, MD  ACR YPS Chair