National Radiology Peer Learning Summit

National Radiology Peer Learning Summit
January 10, 2020, 9am – 2:15pm

National Radiology Peer Learning Summit

January 10, 2020, 9am – 2:15pm
Attend via live stream
This free, four-hour virtual summit sponsored by the ACR will convene invited experts and thought leaders to define the concept and parameters of peer learning. The goal is to develop a white paper to document the current state of programs and to recommend a strategy for implementing effective peer-learning practices for all radiologists in the U.S.

Topics to be addressed include:

  • The practical differences that exist between small and large practices as well as academic and private practices
  • Direction from the Joint Commission and ACR Accreditation on expectations and recommendations
  • The differences between peer learning and peer review
  • Challenges implementing peer learning systems
  • How peer learning fits within regulatory needs

Sign up for this free live stream event

Reserve my spot

Invited Speakers

Jonathan Kruskal, MD, PhD, FACR
Melvin E. Clouse Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, and Chairman, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

David B. Larson, MD, MBA
Associate Professor of Pediatric Radiology and Vice Chair of Education and Clinical Operations at the Stanford University Medical Center  

Mythreyi Chatfied, PhD
EVP Quality & Safety, American College of Radiology

Richard M. Sharpe Jr., MD
Department Value Advisor, Kaiser Permanente operations, Colorado, and Chair, Kaiser Permanente National Interregional Clinical Practice Group for Radiology

Jennifer Broder, MD
Vice Chair of Quality and Safety, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center Department of Radiology, and Assistant Professor of Radiology, Tufts Medical School

Richard M. Heller, MD, FACR
Vice President of Clinical Services and National Director of Pediatric Radiology at Radiology Partners

Andrew Moriarity, MD
Diagnostic Radiologist, Advanced Radiology Services

Jay K. Pahade, MD
Associate Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and Vice Chair of Quality and Safety, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, Yale University School of Medicine

Lane Donnelly, MD
Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, and Chief Quality Officer, Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital Stanford

Olga R. Brook, MD
Associate Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, and Clinical Director of CT at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Ramin Khorasani, MD, MPH, FACR
Vice Chair, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School Radiology

Agenda


Introduction and Framing

Moderator: Jonathan Kruskal

Summit Goals – Peer Learning: Why and Why Now? Jonny Kruskal
Peer Learning Defined: What It Is and What It Is Not David Larson
What We Have Learned About PR & PL: A Survey of Needs and a Review of the Literature Nadja Kadom


Peer Learning Practices in Different Environments –
Current Best Practices and Lessons Learned on the Journey

Moderator: David Larson

Large Academic Practice Jay Pahade
Small Academic Practice Jennifer Broder
Large Private Practice Rich Heller
Medium Private Practice Andy Moriarty
Integrated Delivery System Rich Sharpe
Interventional Radiology Services Olga Brook
Residency Programs TBA
International Experiences: Canada and the UK TBA
Q&A – Moving from Subjective to Objective Scoring David Larson

Essential Considerations

Moderator: Jonathan Kruskal

Hurdles to Implementing Peer Learning and How to Overcome Them Lane Donnelly
Are Certifying Bodies Willing to Support a Transition from Peer Review to Peer Learning? What Do We Need to Consider? Mythreyi Chatfield
IT Solutions for Peer Learning Ramin Khorasani
Getting That Just Culture—Fostering Acceptable Participation in Peer Learning TBA
Q&A
Interventional Radiology Services Olga Brook
Residency Programs TBA
International Experiences: Canada and the UK TBA
Q&A – Moving from Subjective to Objective Scoring David Larson

Small Group Discussions

(not available on live stream)
  • Where does peer learning fit into the learning healthcare system? Is there another iteration beyond peer learning or is it the end state?
  • How can we know whether peer learning is working?
  • In what contexts might traditional peer review be more appropriate than peer learning?
  • What should be the strategy to promote peer learning? Promote widespread adoption, encourage its use, or simply allow as an alternative to peer review?
  • What should be the requirements to be considered a peer learning program? Are there any elements that should be excluded from a peer learning program (e.g., case scoring)?
  • What would be helpful from the perspective of industry partners?

 

10-Minute Group Report Outs

All group moderators

Wrap-up and Next Steps

Jonathan Kruskal/David Larson